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Upgrade to an SSD hard drive Prescott: Speed, Reliability, and Greater Capacity

Upgrade to an SSD hard drive Prescott: Speed, Reliability, and Greater Capacity

hard drive Prescott

What is a hard drive or solid state drive? Buy Hard Drive Prescott

The traditional spinning hard drive (HDD) is the basic storage on a computer. That is, information on it doesn’t “go away” when you turn off the system, as is the case with data stored in RAM. A hard drive is essentially a metal platter with a magnetic coating that stores your data. A read/write head on an arm accesses the data while the platters are spinning.

An SSD (solid state drive) does functionally everything a hard drive does, but data is instead stored on interconnected flash memory chips that retain the data even when there’s no power present. The chips can either be permanently installed on the system’s motherboard, as on some small laptops or in a box that’s sized, shaped, and wired to slot in for a laptop or desktop’s hard drive (common on everything else). These flash memory chips are of a different type than is used in USB thumb drives, and are typically faster and more reliable. SSDs are consequently more expensive than USB thumb drives of the same capacities.

Advantages and Disadvantages – Buy Hard Drive Prescott

Both SSDs and hard drive do the same job: They boot your system, and store your applications and personal files. But each type of storage has its own unique feature set. How do they differ, and why would you want to get one over the other?

Price: SSDs are more expensive than hard drives in terms of dollar per gigabyte. 

Maximum and Common Capacity: Both HDD and SSD can range in their storage capacities, though for the cost HDD usually can store a bit more.

Speed: This is where SSDs shine. An SSD-equipped PC will boot in less than a minute, and often in just seconds. A hard drive requires time to speed up to operating specs, and will continue to be slower than an SSD during normal use. A PC or Mac with an SSD boots faster, launches and runs apps faster, and transfers files faster. Whether you’re using your computer for fun, school, or business, the extra speed may be the difference between finishing on time and failing.

Fragmentation: Because of their rotary recording surfaces, hard drive work best with larger files that are laid down in contiguous blocks. That way, the drive head can start and end its read in one continuous motion. When hard drives start to fill up, large files can become scattered around the disk platter, causing the drive to suffer from what’s called fragmentation. While read/write algorithms have improved to the point that the effect is minimized, hard drives can still become fragmented. SSDs can’t, however, because the lack of a physical read head means data can be stored anywhere. Thus, SSDs are inherently faster.

Durability: An SSD has no moving parts, so it is more likely to keep your data safe in the event you drop your laptop bag or your system is shaken about by an earthquake while it’s operating. Most hard drives park their read/write heads when the system is off, but they are flying over the drive platter at a distance of a few nanometers when they are in operation. Besides, even parking brakes have limits. If you’re rough on your equipment, an SSD is recommended.

Availability: Hard Drives are more plentiful in budget and older systems, but SSDs are becoming more prevalent in recently released laptops. For PCs and Mac desktops, internal hard drives won’t be going away completely, at least for the next few years. However, SSD model lines are growing in number.

Form Factors: Because hard drives rely on spinning platters, there is a limit to how small they can be manufactured. SSDs have no such limitation, so they can continue to shrink as time goes on. SSDs are available in 2.5-inch laptop drive-sized boxes, but that’s only for convenience. As laptops continue to become slimmer and tablets take over as primary platforms for Web surfing, you’ll start to see the adoption of SSDs skyrocket.

Noise: Even the quietest hard drive will emit a bit of noise when it is in use from the drive spinning or the read arm moving back and forth, particularly if it’s in a system that’s been banged about or if it’s been improperly installed in an all-metal system. Faster hard drives will make more noise than those that are slower. SSDs make virtually no noise at all, since they’re non-mechanical.

Power: An SSD doesn’t have to expend electricity spinning up a platter from a standstill. Consequently, none of the energy consumed by the SSD is wasted as friction or noise, rendering them more efficient. On a desktop or in a server, that will lead to a lower energy bill. On a laptop or tablet, you’ll be able to eke out more minutes (or hours) of battery life.

 

The PC Works Highly recommends the SSD hard drive upgrade. Our techs all use the SSD hard drives and notice a BIG difference. If you’re looking to upgrade your computer give us a call today at 928-775-5475 or 928-445-6700!

 

hard drive Prescott

 

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